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Florida Man Killed By ‘World’s Most Dangerous Bird’ That He Kept As A Pet

It would seem “Florida Man” strikes again.

News has come out about a man killed on his farm. The Florida man was killed by his own pet bird.

Alachua County Fire Rescue Department reported to a local paper, the Gainsville Sun, that a Florida man was killed after falling down. After he fell, he was attacked by his pet cassowary.

How did he get killed by a bird?

Deputy Chief, Jeff Taylor explained to the Sun,

“My understanding is that the gentleman was in the vicinity of the bird and at some point, fell. When he fell, he was attacked.”

First responders received the call 10 a.m. last Friday. They rushed the man to the hospital, but he died from his injuries. He was 75 years old.

No seriously, how was he killed by a dumb bird?

…Okay, that is not a bird. That is a dinosaur hiding from evolution.

Cassowaries are often called the most dangerous bird. They can grow to the size of an adult human, reaching up to 6 feet (180cm). They have a four-inch (10cm) claw on each foot that reminds me of a velociraptor from Jurassic Park.

Oh, and their powerful legs let them run up to 31 mph (50kph) and slice open flesh with a powerful kick.

This brings me to my next question.

Who in their right mind would own one of these things?!

As you can imagine, owning a cassowary is a regulated affair. You have to obtain a permit from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Part of the process to obtain one is showing substantial experience with the bird, as well as having a proper cage.

The commission lists the cassowary as wildlife that can pose a danger to people. I’d say that’s an understatement.

Despite these dangers, the bird is often sought as an exotic pet.

At the moment, the bird is secured on the man’s property. It is unknown at this time what will happen to the animal.

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Written by Ben Acosta

Ben Acosta is an Arizona-based fiction author and freelance writer. In his free time, he critiques media and acts in local stage productions.