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Latino Man Confronted By Cops And Woman With Large Knife After They Assumed He ‘Abducted’ His Lighter-Skinned Grandchild

ABC 7

While enjoying an afternoon out with his grandson, a Latino man in Torrance, California, was forced to explain to police that he was not abducting the child, who’s skin color was a lighter shade than his.

ABC 7 reported that Abel Mata, who was born in Mexico and moved to the U.S. when he was just five years old, was at his own home with his 2-year-old grandson when a woman accused him of kidnapping before she called the police to report her assumption.

Mata told ABC that he heard tell of a report of a child being abducted, that it was “a Latino man with a little white baby.”

He went on to describe his accuser:

“It was an older White lady, blond hair, curly hair.” 

“She was telling me that I was an abductor. She was yelling that I was trying to abduct the child.” 

Police arrived to find a couple of things, ABC 7 went on to report. Immediately, they quickly saw that Mata was a legitimate caregiver of the child. 

But police also encountered a woman with a large knife enclosed in a sheath when they arrived.

Police said they could not determine whether this woman was the same person who called the police and made the allegation of abduction. They also stated that no charges could be brought to her because she did not make any threats.

Mata shared how terribly he felt upon being accused. 

“I was judged according to the color of my skin and the color of the skin of my grandson.”

“It’s painful. Very painful.”

Mata’s daughter, Athena also shared her outrage with the news outlet. 

“We’ve lived in Southern California our whole lives and I’ve seen my dad experience racism because of the color of his skin and the way he looks, but never to this extent.”

When the story made the rounds on Twitter, people expressed their own outrage.

Some were appalled that the woman who accused Mata didn’t face any consequences. 

Many people found the incident relatable. They explained that for people of color all over, this is commonly a reality. 

We hope, with unfortunately little confidence, that Mr. Mata never has to deal with discrimination like this again. 

Eric Spring

Written by Eric Spring

Eric Spring lives in New York City. He has poor vision and cooks a good egg. Most of his money is spent on live music and produce. He usually wears plain, solid color sweatshirts without hoods because he assumes loud patterns make people expect something big. Typically, he'll bypass a handshake and go straight for the hug.